String succulents are beautiful, quirky, sometimes look otherworldly, and are so darn cute! If you were tempted to buy a slew of succulents after our quiz, you’re not alone. Succulents are a total conversation-starter, can make any room more vibrant, and did I mention cute? The best part is that they’re easy to care for, so they’re great for beginners and those of you with the oddly colored thumb—you know who you are. Here are the answers to our string succulents identification quiz.

String of Watermelon

As the name suggests, these succulents look like miniature watermelons. These beauties are native to Namibia and South Africa and require watering only when the soil is completely dry. The little watermelon-shaped leaves have purple veining and produce white flowers in the spring. Think watermelon is a summer thing? Not with these around! These succulents will make you want a juicy slice, but don’t eat them as they are poisonous.

String of Pearls

The string of pearls succulent is native to southwest Africa. This succulent blooms in the summer and its trailing pearl-shaped leaves make for a perfect hanging-basket plant. They grow well indoors and outdoors and like strong indirect light, so if you’re growing them outdoors, place them in a shaded area but where they can still get indirect sunlight. Don’t over-water your string of pearls; shoot for every two weeks in the summer and every month in the winter.

String of Bananas

String of bananas looks like, well, bananas on a vine. They do well in almost all types of temperatures, but don’t put them near an air conditioner or a heater. And the shade is the key; don’t put it in direct sunlight or they will burn quickly. The trails can be as long as 6 inches, and like all succulents, make sure the soil is dry before you water again as they are susceptible to root rot.

String of Tears

When blooming, the flowers of the string of tears plant has a cinnamon scent. With leaves shaped like a teardrop, these succulents can have a trail up to a foot long. They, too, like lots of indirect sunlight and will burn if placed in direct sun. Since they are native to arid regions, they store water in their stems and leaves, so as with the other string succulents, water them only when the soil is completely dry.

Fish Hook Succulent

Sometimes confused with string of bananas, you can tell the difference between the two because the fish hook succulent has bluish-green leaves which are less plump than the banana variety. The fish hook succulent loves sunlight but not direct exposure. Water it thoroughly, but wait until the soil is dry to water again.

So there you have it, answers to our string succulents identification pop quiz. We hope you think they’re as cool and cute as we do. For novices and experts alike, string succulents make a delightful addition to any home or outdoor garden. 

This site is full of tips and tutorials for taking great care of your houseplants, so make sure to look around! You’ll be an expert in no time!

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